The Higher Ed Marketer
The Higher Ed Marketer

Episode 70 · 4 months ago

Effectively Utilizing Your Website To Market Your College

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

People often look at websites from just a technical or aesthetic point of view but overlook how a website can be an excellent marketing tool to help shape communications and marketing goals.  

Joshua Charles, the Director of Web Strategy and Technology at Rutgers Business School, joins us to discuss how you can utilize your website to market your college. Joshua brings excellent insights from what they have done at Rutgers University to increase enrollment and retention through their website.  

Join us as we discuss:

  • How Rutgers Business School is positively affecting Recruitment and Retention via their websites. 
  •  How to better address the entire student life cycle through the website.
  • Maximizing results while managing restrained resources.

The High Red Marketering podcast is sponsored by the ZEMI APP enabling colleges and universities to engage interested students before they even apply. You're listening to the Higher Ed Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals in higher education. This show will tackle all sorts of questions related to student recruitment, donor relations, marketing trends, new technologies and so much more. If you're looking for conversations centered around where the industry is going, this podcast is for you. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the High Red Marketer podcast. My name is troice singer and I am here with Bart Kaylor, my co host, and each week we interview higher reed marketers that we admire for the benefit and the betterment of the entire higher d community. Today we talked to Joshua Charles. He's the director of Web Governance and communications within the Office of Communications and marketing of the rutgers business school. Today we talked to him about effectively utilizing your website to market your college. And I'll just say it up front, Joshua is an interesting guy and yes, he has technical ability, but he's one of those people who work on a website that has marketing at the forefront and I love this conversation with him. Yeah, it's such a great conversation. I think that Joshua and I align so much on our philosophy, on the way that we both think of content first and the user first, and I think that Joshua does such a great job of articulating that and really articulating the things that they've done at rutgers that I think really impact enrollment, really impact that student journey and makes such a difference. And I think that I really listened to what Joshua has to say and I don't care if you're a small school or a big school, I think everything Joshua says can apply to you and, uh, we're so fortunate have have people like Joshua Rutgers and and a lot of the other schools that we've talked to to really be able to give us this great information. Here's our conversation with Joshua Charles. Joshua Charles has agreed to talk to us about some of the dynamic things that they're doing at the records business school in relationships with their website and how it's positively affecting both enrollment, alumni, etcetera. Joshua, if you would tell us a little bit about the business school and your role there? Sure. Thank you. So my role at the business school is to oversee website operations and marketing technology, and that's for the whole school. Are Our full school has ten thousand students, four hundred faculty, a hundred and seventy five staff Um recently now fifty thousand alumni over the course of the last several decades. Uh. And really for me and my team were thinking about how does the website fit into...

...the journeys for each of the different audiences that we have from prospective students, current students, faculty, staff, Alumni, corporate partners, media, Um, all of these groups. We want the websites that we have, and there are multiple websites, to be able to to sort of serve the user needs as well as to positively influence the business aspects as well. Thank you, Joshua, and the reason why we had you on although we think of what web master as being more technically minded that you have, but you also are known for your approach of how you can utilize the website to positively affect both enrollment as well as the entire student journey, and would like for you to tell us a little bit about that, maybe, starting out with the deliberate transition that the website made. Was it back in two thousand and fifteen? Yes, yes, so, originally I came to rutgers business school and we had a rather static website that tried to do everything for everyone. It was a single website and those only website the school had. And as we decided to grow our team over time, fast forward to realize hey, we need to have a mobile design because that's where websites were heading at that time. And at the same time we're like, okay, this is an opportunity to rethink the purpose of a website altogether. Now for our school, our communications and marketing team has website operations inside of the team, whereas at the time that was more commonly associated with I t because, like you mentioned, websites first thing that folks think about is technical aspect, but to me a website is a marketing platform first and foremost, and it has technology associated with that, but its goal is to shape communications and marketing goals. So we used the website redesign process as a way to rethink the strategy of our website so that, instead of a single site for every audience, we decided to split it up. First thing, we need a website that is for external audiences, primarily prospect of students, so that when somebody is searching full time NBA content, for example, Um, the main website the one that we really want them to go to, because we want to help that prospect of student journey. We want those audiences to find the right pages and search engines and once they get onto the page that we want them to be able to have a an experience that's tailor made for what their needs are. That specifically means things like, Hey, here's an upcoming admissions event, here's how you can go to sign up for um a newsletter, for example. Here's where the admissions details are. And when you have a singular focus, it makes it a lot easier to figure out what types of content and design can you shape your website for in order to meet that specific users needs? And and that's the at a very high level, that's the approach that we took with...

...the website back then and of course there's a whole bunch of other last to that, but that is why we started to be much more strategic about how we're going to handle sites going forward. I think that's such a great point and I love the way that you guys approached that because I think too many times, and what I see a lot of times, and Joshua, you've been doing this and you probably saw this as well, is that the the website tends to be kind of this House that was built in the mid nineties or early two thousand's and it's like, oh well, we need another room, so we're just gonna stick on another edition and Hey, let's let's, you know, have another story added on, and it just gets to be this unwieldy beast. I mean sometimes I talked to clients and even small to medium sized schools, they might have eight, ten pages and I'm like, we don't need that for enrollment. We don't need that level of content sometimes for just enrollment. And so I really I'm really glad to see you guys have just kind of started from the question of what do we need per audience for their jourse me and I think that's a really important, important thing. So how do you do that? As far as when you start making some of those decisions about the types of content. I think. I think you made a good point that you know it's not it's it's a it's a tool, it's and it has some technical aspects to it, but at the end of the day it's it's a marketing platform and ultimately, a content platform. How do you kind of make those decisions about the messages and the images and how you're positioning those within the context of this tool? Sure, so, I like to describe it as the intersection between fully understanding the audience and what their journey and what their needs are and your organization's business cools. So Um, splitting those in half. For the for the audience, it's where do they read about Um business schools when they're looking for which college to enroll in? Um, what types of questions are they asking? Is it related to admissions, their their T P, a Um, the curriculum? What is it that they're seeking and searching for? Those those why questions and then, once you have a good understanding of what those are from doing marketing research, perhaps having forms on your website we're asking for for comments or anything like that so that Um folks that are getting to the website can just tell you exactly what they're looking for. Um, your you synthesize all of that data and then you map out, okay, this is what students are looking for for each of the different programs that we have and here's what their journey looks like before they get to our website, once they get to our website, once they've had a chance to engage with maybe the program director or or staff or other students, hopefully, Um, once you have an idea of what that journey is and what they're looking for. And and that can be an editor process because, Um, the reality is teams have very limited resources. So no one is going to be able to have full resources to map out a full journey before they start. They it's something that you have to work towards over time. But once you have that good understanding of what the audience is...

...looking for, what their needs are, so you understand how to meet those needs, then you think about what are your own business goals, particularly enrollments or or engagement or just getting your brand out there, and then you figure out how do you map your needs along their journey, because at the end of the day, the goal has to remain customer centric. Uh, and from there that can give you an idea of this is the type of content that we need to have on our site. These are the types of things that folks are looking to engage with. And if sure, if you want to jazz it up with ambient videos and all sorts of things, those things are nice too, as long as it doesn't get in the way of taking action. Right. So, figuring out all of these details, and it's complicated, but you need a team of folks that can help you. If if that's available. If not, then by all means trying to network with other parts of the university, particularly student student services, trying to pool internal resources to figure these these detailed is out before I ever decide to make changes to the website, because otherwise that just creates a situation where we're just changing things for the sake of changing things. It's again, Um, I know it sounds complicated, but just thinking about the user journey, first and foremost, your business needs. How do you merge those things together? And then from there that can help determine the content the design. Um You can talk about like, okay, these are the technical things that we need in order to make this content work, Um, and that is ultimately how we produce it and, of course, you know again a web player design. Took US two years to do all of that. So it's a process, but that's we believe in that process, so that's what we stuck with. We talk a lot about it on this show. Schools are really struggling today to make the same at spen work. CPMS are up eight nine year over a year. On facebook and instagram. Our College clients are no longer looking for rented audiences. They're looking for an owned community where they can engage students even before they up. Why? This is why Zemi has become so crucial for our clients. With over one million students, close to ten thou five star ratings, consistently ranked as one of the top social lapps and recently one of Apple's hot APPs of the week. There simply isn't anything out there like it, and we have seen it all. Zeem me not only provides the best space for student engagement, but the most unique and actional data for the one sixty college and university partners. We know firsthand from our clients that Zee me is a must have strategy for Gen z check them out now at colleges dot Zem dot com. That's colleges dot Z E M E dot Com. And yes, tell them Barton Troy sent you. I like that. We had um Jay bar on the episode on the hired podcast a few weeks ago and hey, you made a big comment, and one of if you read any of his books or follow any of his his materials, he really makes a big, big push that the fact that you know we need to answer the questions that people have. I mean it goes back to being customer centric,...

...you know, prospective students centric, and you know, doing the research and understanding those and sometimes, I know I talked to some of my clients and working with the enrollment team or with student services and saying, what are the questions that people ask? You know, if you took those questions, you could probably come up with fifty of them over lunch Um. If you took those questions and then, you know, flipped it around and wrote a five, d seven, fifty word essay that answered those questions and did a little bit of keyword research. You just had a blog strategy ready for a year and you've got a lot of really good content. So a lot of times I think that understanding the customers needs the journeys, understanding ways to get that content in front of them and and and start providing that to them. I think it's it's such a such a valuable thing and I'm so glad that that you guys are doing that and that you've got kind of a process in place that you've been explaining some things as well. So well as you think that through. I know one of the things that I'm even looking at your website. You guys have outcomes on there and I think it's one of the big, big things that students are looking wars. You know, if I'm going to invest in this, what's going to be the outcome for me at the other end? How did that messaging kind of get positioned with the alumni? I mean certainly the alumni are your success stories. How did you guys use that as part of the redesign? UH, sure, so it's it's a great question. One of the interesting approaches to the specific language that we have on the website, particularly outcomes, particularly for business students. That is something that we found not only on the prospect of students side, when they're asking questions of admissions. These are some of the things that come up about okay, if if I am looking at rutgers business school, like what are some of the career outcomes for me and finance or or accounting or supply chain management? And then when we have those conversations directly with students or with student services who are having the conversations anyway, you start to hear the same questions about what are the outcomes, what are the industries? What are the specific names of the companies? What are some of the job titles? And then you have those those conversations with alumni and they're saying the same thing. We realize, okay, prospect of students are asking questions about this, current students are asking questions as they progress through their own journey. Alumni who are filling those roles and are coming back and sharing their experience with experiences with other students, they're saying the same thing. So for when we have that level of alignment and again for for business school students. I can speak for for math and engineering and things like that, but for business school students, we realize, okay, that is a great content opportunity. This is an opportunity for us to be able to look through our data. Um asked alumni where they've went that, whether that is ninety days after graduation, whether that's five years, ten years, have a wide variety of alumni come back and give us their experiences. Hopefully there's a process in place to collect that information. That sometimes can be a challenge because we can't assume that alumni are just going to reach out to us whenever they want to. So it's important to for the alumni...

...offices development to maintain relationships over time so that when it comes to asking these sort of questions about the experiences, so that we can go back and write about that content and those outcomes on our website and our marketing materials on our billboards along to eight and all of these other roads in New Jersey. Um We're a relying on facts, um, but be we're basing that off of real experiences from our alumni and from the questions that the students are looking for while they're in the program as well as the questions that project of students are looking for as they begin their own journey. And again it's it's a great opportunity to Um to have those content ideas come from that audience. Joshua, what's wonderful to hear you talk about the specific user audiences, whether it's prospective students alumni, but could you describe to us how you've positioned the website to address the entire student journey? Yes, so that the thing that we decided to do is think about again, as we were talking about before, you know, first identifying what all all of the different audiences are. But from there, how do you create website experiences and, I would say, sort of navigation paths along the way to support all of these different audiences? So the first thing that we did during that website re design process is split our original website into a prospect of student and that's our main site, and then we have a now a separate site specifically for current students, faculty and stuff, and we're thinking about what the alumni pieces right now. We decided that sure, we can have some information about, hey, here's how to update your contact information, or here are some really cool stories about things that have been going on in the school lately, and an alumni can come to that part of the website and find information. But for them we actually want to create a more engaged in experience. So we're developing this platform that allows alumni to log in and engage with each other and it's it's much more personal that way. So it's not more of a hey, come to this the static website and read about information that everyone has access to. Here's your your personal section. Instead, that's specifically for our BS alumni. So for us we decided our main website is going to be the prospect of students space and our internal site is going to be for current students along their journey and then this separate log in platform specifically for alumni. That's going to be their space and along the way we need to just make sure that we are on the same page, just communications of marketing with student services office as well as the alumni group, so that we're all aware of the types of content that's going to be helpful along each of those three stops, Um, and at the same time making sure that we are just allowing each of the audiences at any point in time to ask questions, to engage and things like that. So it's...

...a it's a trifecta approach. and Um, you know, outside of those three groups, again we we have, uh, the media, journalists and things like that, um on our main website as well. But you know, with the students. It's it's it was just very important for us to think about every step along the way and to make sure that they're not silo even though the three stype of websites, there is communication and experiences that are connected across those from the types of content that we create as well as the relationships that we have inside the school between the stakeholders who manage the different audiences. I like that because I think it's so important. You mentioned the silos and we've talked to several guests on the show about just the ideas of silos and it came up the other day. Someone was talking about silos and they were like, oh, we don't have silos, we have cylinders of excellence, and they were they were being serious about it and taking pride in that. But I think that the idea of really being able to allow people, Um, allow prospective students, alumni, the different audiences, to be able to what I would almost call some personalization, being able to, you know, go to the content and go to an area that's going to be more about their needs, as opposed to forcing them into a generalized area to be able to then have to find their you know, to meet their needs. I really think that's a really good approach to to how you do that and I applaud you guys on that. Help me understand a little bit too about Um. How do you help the transition between you know that that you know matriculated student. I mean they've been on the they've been on the public website through their journey. They you know, go through Orient they go through orientation. Now they're now they're an enrolled student. Now they're being introduced into that new intranet for for enrolled students and then, you know, once they graduate, you've got a lot of students now. You know last week, a couple of weeks ago, they've graduated. Now they're moving into more of that extra net for alumni. How do you kind of communicate that, that transition that makes it very natural and easy for them and not kind of like a shock to the systems ay well, I'm used to this, why am I changing now? Yeah, so that's Um. That has been one of the most interesting sort of journeys just for us as a as a school, because you look across the entire record university system, I think we all, all of the different web teams, are trying to to make sure that the transition from a prospect to an admitted student Uh to a an enrolled student and just what that experience looks like, not just from the website but from all of the different technical platforms that students have to see once they become a student Um. The thing that I think is critical to the success of that is communication, communication, communication, and what I mean by that is that Um we are communications and marketing. There's separate team teams for every single program in the school. Now that is twenty plus. We have to be able to think about what are all of the natural ways that a student may seek information?...

That may be phone calls, that may be using Google search to find information, whatever shows up there. That could be emails, bulletin boards that are in the office and the Internet. From there we think about, okay, here are all of the ways that students may naturally look for information. How do we make sure that in each of those different areas we are placing the correct information about what they should be looking for in those places? And that is going to require a lot of regular communication between the folks who manage the websites and the folks who are helping with internal communication inside of the school, which is usually the Dean's office. UH, too. Just make sure that we are communicating in a two way conversation, not one way, a two way conversation with each of the programs to say, okay, here, here are all of the different websites that we have, this is why we have them, this is what they're for for your students. This is where you should be sending them if they have questions about the curriculum, career management, Um, anything like that. Just make sure that in orientation Um, once they become enrolled in each of the classes, maybe that in their LMS, for example, a canvas or blackboard that the faculty are are communicating. Hey, this is where you go for resources. It's part of the syllaby. Every main document that they see, um, their regular email communication that they have from the professors, from their staff, when they go into their offices to speak to their advisors. Everyone is on the same page about what is the quickest way to access information that is helpful for a student to be able to complete their their classes and their time at rutgers in a reasonable and fast process. Um, it has to be. That has to be the goal, uh, and in order to do that that means that sure that we oversee the website, but a huge part of our job is also internal communication and what we can't just think about ourselves as just the content design and the tech folks or the website. It also has to that plus internal stakeholder Um collaboration, I would say, and you know that it's it's it's not always going to be easy when you have that many groups that that have to be on the same page, but we can't sort of set a little bar because at the end of the day, the stakeholders are our students and anything that we don't do well or is miscommunicated affects their experience and when their experiences affected, everyone's experience is affected. So we have to make sure that, um, these sort of things are well communicated and that that really relies on strong leadership to be able to make sure that everyone is working towards shared outcomes. Yeah, I think that's great. There's a book that I'm reading that I've been recommending lately, called good services. It's by Lou down. He's the he's in charge of a lot of the service design in the UK and uh, I really like it because he's doing exactly what he kind of maps out a process for what you're talking about is that not only can we just do...

...the things that we typically think of design, like websites and communications and things like that, we actually have to design the service around that so that, you know, if we're thinking about a student, how do we remove all of the challenges that they have to succeed? And I really like the fact that you guys are really trying to do that by communicating with all the different departments and and how that works. And and I think that's challenging for a lot of schools. I mean I work with some smaller schools and uh, and I know that with with all schools, I know it's the case, but especially with smaller schools, there's always this challenge about restrained resources. I mean it's like, Hey, we don't have enough people, we don't have enough budget, we don't have enough time. Everything is is kind of a little bit of a constriction. I mean how do you how do you kind of maximize these results with your with trying to manage these restrained resources? I'm sure that you guys ran into it even with I mean even with the top name business school. I mean it's not unlimit it. You have to work within, within, you know, within some boundaries. Yeah, you're you're exactly right. Uh, you know, it's it's always, Um, I feel like the the every other week question that that comes up in terms of like, okay, we have a lot of ideas, we we go on walks, we have internal conversations in person on Zoom uh, and that's just our team. And then there are the multile meetings that I have with various groups from like executive education to I t and just to make sure that we're all trying to to work towards shared outcomes. The reality is we're always going to have restrained resources and I think sometimes where it gets overwhelming isn't thinking about like, Oh, these are all of the different things that that we have to do. Um. That may be the case, but at some point we have to accept what our strengths are and maybe what we have to kind of let go or, at the very at least, say, you know what, here's our calendar, these are the things that were that we're excited about, that we're proud to try to achieve, and these other things. It doesn't mean that they're not important, but it means that we don't want to burn out our employees to try to ask them to work fifty, sixty hours in order to to just check a box, to be able to say that, hey, these fifty things that we set out to do this year that we would like to do Um, we're going to do them no matter what. Like that. That can't happen. Like we can't try to Um make the school be perfect in every way, shape or form at the expense of the employees, because the employees are central to the student experience. And again, like if when the student the staff side of things doesn't work well, it ultimately impacts Um, the students. So what I try to do is to decide, okay, like, for for example, this summer we were we recently mapped out here are the five areas that we will like to...

...focus on for each individual on our web team and decided okay, one of those is going to be specific customer journey content, revamping of our graduate programs and just at least thinking about how do we make sure that the content is fresh and that we're more accurately speaking to the needs of graduate prospect of students in the age of covid because that is significantly different than it was two years ago and our web content may not be up to date. And for each of the individual individuals on our team, we say these are the five areas that we're going to work towards. Now it would be great to be able to say at the end of that yes, we nailed everything, but it's more about just working towards goals that we would feel proud of. And we can, we can make adjustments as we go, but I am not going to Um sacrifice these these uh, these these Um, these long goals at the expense of the staff. And you know, those are hard conversations because at some point you might have to have a conversation with your director or your Dean about what the prior parties are. But those are conversations that we in leadership positions have to be willing to have because again, just as we say, websites are not um for everyone. Um every goal may not be achievable and we have to decide, as a school and as leaders, what are the things that are absolutely most important to us, what is it going to take to do those things? Are we staffed enough to be able to execute those and what's second tier, third tier priorities. They could be stretched goals. It would be nice, but if it comes at the expense of the staff morale and what they can do and they're sacrificing their nights and weekends away from their family, that's that's a no go um. So again it's it's not easy, but we have to have conversations about what's realistic and what's feasible and those conversations need to be had from leadership standpoint and once you have them, they need to be abided by Um as we continue to work towards the goals for the school. Yeah, I like that and it goes right with what you said earlier about the idea of having those conversations, having those I mean it's it's in today's Day and age. I don't care what industry you're in. I think the more and more that we talk, the more and more that we can have those conversations, the more critical it is because you know, it's it's not the way it's always been. It's so dynamic in every aspect of what we're doing and you know, it's a lot easier to do a lot more things than we used to be able to do, and so I think that there has to be hard decisions made, conversations had, priorities developed, because at the end of the day, we just cannot do everything that we want to because sometimes that limited resources, just time, time, and it stuff. Joshua, in every episode we ask our guest if there was a piece of advice that they could leave either for their colleagues and maybe, in your instance, your marketing colleagues, that our listeners could implement immediately or soon after listening to the episode. What advice or piece of advice...

...would you offer? The first thing that comes to mind is, uh, networking internally, and what I specifically mean by that is trying to find people that can help champion your ideas, because sometimes you might come up with like a change to a workflow for first student services, or communication, the marketing or I T. whatever the subject may be, and that idea has to be shared with a one of the deans who has to make the ultimate decision about how you move forward with something and they have so many other responsibilities and things that they have to think about. Um In in my experience, the things that are helpful and the conversations that I end up having with staff from other rucker schools about like hey, I have this challenge in in my school and I just wanted to know what you think, or every things like that. We talk about try to find other folks who can buy into an idea so that the more different individuals are talking about your vision, your goals to senior leadership, about things that you would like to see happen in the school and and and or your team, the easier it is for those things to have success. Uh. So, for example, if we're thinking about, hey, you know, we want salesforce to really be the platform that is going to be helpful to to manage prospect of student data, current student data, corporate partners and all of these other audiences. But you now we're really not there yet and that's a very expensive proposition. Um, it's one thing if it's just the I T director that's saying that. It becomes a different thing when it's the I T director and it's communications and marketing and it's exact ad and its alumni relations and everyone is on the same page talking about things. Over time, it then becomes the idea of the dean. Andy're like, okay, all of these different folks are saying like this is important and important thing. This is maybe something that we should move forward with Um. Well, we'll, we'll get the right stakeholders to to make it happen. I've tried to approach several times on on things that Um would be helpful for the school as a whole, even though they're not necessarily communications and marketed, things like the building and of an Internet to create that personalization for current students, for example, and it has ultimately worked. Now we still have to figure out implementation, but we got the idea agreed upon by our our deans to move forward with, because we're having conversations with different stakeholders around the school about, Hey, this would be a great idea, and the more people talk about things, the more they can they can work out. So my advice is to Um just really spend a lot of time on networking and helping each other, for folks that are either within the same school or, if you work on a larger university, folks that are across the campus, so that that that collective change can be really powerful instead of it just being your voice that's trying to change something. Thank you, Joshua. Is Very well said. I'm sure that there will be people that would like to contact you...

...after this podcast is listened to. What would be the best way for our listeners to reach out and connect with you? I think the fastest way is linkedin. If you search for Joshua Charles Um Um I'm I believe it's Linkedin Dot com forward slash Joshua Charles um or on twitter. You can find me there as well, and those are the the easiest ways to find him. I'm always happy to chat about anything website related, leadership related, higher I related, I don't care. I feel like we can't look at different schools as competitors all the time. We're all working towards the same goals in different ways, and the more that we as a community can help each other, I think we're all better for it. Thank you, when you've reminded me that you are a wonderful follow. So I would put it out there to our listeners, even if you don't feel compelled to connect with Joshua, at least follow him because you share a lot of great content. And thank you very much for that and thank you for being a guest on the High Reed Marketer podcast. Thank you for having me, Mart do you have any final thoughts? You'd like to share with us. Yeah, I just want to say thank you again, Joshua, for being here and I really wanted to point out a few things that Joshua said that I think we're just so critical, kind of the nuggets as we kind of walk away. You remember that the website is not, you know, this isn't your grandfather's website. This is uh, this is, you know, we have to think of it in three the idea that we're all more about content and more about marketing than anything else. Uh, you know, quit. You know, so many people still talk about html and talk about all this other things. The website is a tool. There's technology out there that you should not have to worry about, you know, being a tool. It's, you know, the the idea. I mean, Troy, you use the word, you know, the term web master earlier. That's probably a term that can kind of be retired because I think it's really a marketing and content tool and I think josh has done a great job of explaining that. I think another thing that Joshua said kind of in passing that I want to make sure everybody remembers, and I think this is a tip that that you could also go out and do, uh, this afternoon, is figure out a way to organize and collect and manage your outcome stories. Um, you know you're gonna have to work together with your with your alumni group, with other people on campus, probably with your faculty, because really students connect back through their faculty to share their updates, to to share what's going on in their life. And if you can have a way that faculty know that, Hey, I just heard from you know, Eric from the class of and he just updated me on what he's doing and it was a fascinating conversation. They need to know a place that they can either tell somebody or put that into a document or a form that you can then manage that and be able to go back and look at that and and be able to sort that and organize that. So it could be as simple as just having a set of Google docs and a folder, but some way that you can manage that, I think is really important.

And then I really also like the fact that, you know, having some personalization. Troy and I've talked many times with different guests about the importance of personalization for our perspective students and I really like the way that Joshua and the team at rutgers has really looked at how to segment and personalize that experience for the different levels of the students and where they are in their journey. I think that's important. And then I think the final things that I really heard a lot about was, you know, just that communication. You know, we talked about you know, many times we're marketing and communications, but we fail to communicate with each other and with the rest of the campus, and so I think it's important to, you know, hear what Joshua said about the ways to his team communicates with one another's that, you know, the walks, the meetings, the Huddles, the way he communicates regularly with those outside of his particular team, with other, you know, other areas of campus and other areas within the business school, as well as just, you know, with limited resources, sometimes communicating and coming up with some brainstorming and ideas together you can often find ways to solve a problem that maybe you hadn't thought of. Because, I mean, I was talking to someone yesterday the idea of, you know, preparing a bunch of uh, you know, printed materials going forward. Well, there are, they're creative ways to do that with digital printing now that you don't always have to think about, well, we're gonna have to buy a whole skin now instead of and we've got to make a decision tomorrow. Now there are ways to kind of think about that and be a little bit more creative in the way that you're approaching those problems and getting get together with a lot of people can often, you know, find those those solutions. So thanks again, Josh with. This has been a wonderful conversation and welcome to have you kept back anytime. Thank you. Thank you. Both the hired marketing podcast is sponsored by the ZEMI APP enabling colleges and universities to engage with their future students at scale before they even apply, and by the Kalis Solutions Group and education marketing and branding agency and by Think, patented, a marketing, execution, print and mailing provider of Higher Ed Solutions. On behalf of Bart Kaylor. I'm troy singer. Thank you for joining us. You've been listening to the Higher Ed Marketer. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you're listening with apple podcasts. We'd love for you to leave a quick rating of the show, simply tap the number of stars do you think the podcast deserves? Until next time,.

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