The Higher Ed Marketer
The Higher Ed Marketer

Episode 79 · 2 months ago

Saving Face and Doing Campus Photography Right

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Many marketers struggle to keep track of photo and video assets on campus, but with the proper techniques, you can implement a campus photography program that can enhance the experience of your university.

Cindi Farmer is the Director of Strategic Marketing and Communication at Arizona State University. Cindi manages teams of designers, photographers, videographers, and writers to create content and tell stories. Her team is responsible for the multi-channel communications to prospective students and bases their work on data-based decisions and design thinking. In this episode, Cindi talks about the best practices for doing campus photography.

Join us as we discuss:

  • The power of faces and why authentic emotion is critical to storytelling
  • The importance of protecting student's identity and keeping privacy of design in mind when using students in marketing
  • Cindy's thoughts on campus photo programs

The High Red Marketer podcast is sponsored by the ZEMI app enabling colleges and universities to engage interested students before they even apply. You're listening to the Higher Ed Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals in higher education. This show will tackle all sorts of questions related to student recruitment, donor relations, marketing trends, new technologies, and so much more. If you're looking for conversations centered around where the industry is going, this podcast is for you. Let's get into the show. Thank you for joining us on the Higher Ed Marketer Podcast. I'm Troy Singer and with Bart Kaylor. Today we're talking to Cindy Farmer. She is with Arizona State University and the topic of our conversation with her is doing campus photography right. She loves to talk about saving faces in UM. She has an inspirational but very informative way of how to properly set up and maintain a campus photography program. Yeah. I love this episode, Troy. It's so it's so applicable. I mean, we all struggle with keeping track of our our assets on campus, with with photography and videography and depending on the size of your campus. You know, you might have a you know, a few hundred shots, you might have a few thousand, you know, a couple hunt tens of thousands of shots. And I think what they're doing at is Arizona State University. It's very good, it's very applicable. They've got some really good, just simple techniques that they're using to be able to keep track of everything. Something that I think that everybody can benefit from listening to, because this this can be dumb down to any size institution. You don't have to have thousands and thousands of dollars of software. This can be done on Google Drive and a few other things. And I love her approach on everything. Um, she's very authentic and and what they're doing at Arizona State is amazing and I'm so excited about this episode. Let's listen in on our conversation with Cindy Farmer. Although we're here to get much knowledge and wisdom from Cindy around images and videography and how to manage that at a large university. Cindy, we would like to ask you at first if there's something that you have learned recently that you can share that's either surprised you or stuck out in any way. Yeah, it's interesting that you asked that because I just learned this this week. Uh. We I work for is Arizona State University. We welcome several thousand new international students this week to campus, and we had our international undergraduate Welcome on Monday morning. UM, our team goes in before the event starts, and we we basically model release the first several rose um of students in parents and make sure they're okay having their picture...

...taken and before the event starts, and I was, And we make it an experience, right. We we don't just say we're gonna take your picture, you know, we explain who we are and what we're gonna use it for. And I met this just really sweet shy student from Jordan's and his father was sitting next to him and they signed the releases. But a couple of minutes later, the father said, Hey, can I ask you a question, UM, what would you do if I said I didn't want my picture taken? And I said, oh, we we put our students first and their preferences first, and so UM we want to respect their wishes. So in a classroom, we would just avoid that student. But in a big you know, in a big setting like this, we would just ask you to find a seat that's not like upfront UM. And he said, you know, I've never seen anybody do this before. And I'm it's so awesome that you put the student in their wishes first, so that you know, it's spoke to me that like our policies and processes are actually are actually saying something you know, um, to our students that we value them. And hearing that from the father how much that meant to him, just was so validating for us in our team. Well, thank you, Cindy, and that's so on brand. I'm not sure if you planned that, but that's sets a wonderful foundation for our conversation today. So Cindy, if you'll let everyone know your role at a s U and a little bit about how you execute that role sixty seconds or less. Sure. So official title is Senior director for Content and Creative So if we're in agency world, I would be the creative director. The teams that I get to empower and energize are the designers, the photographers, the videographers, and the writers. Um. And we have a brilli, a group of folks, and it's just so fun to create content and tell stories together. Thank you, Cindy. And the reason why we're talking today is to give your program, or hopefully you can share some of the secret sauce how you manage the wonderful image and video program that you do and how you teach it to your colleagues at a s U. Now to give everyone perspective a s U with a very large university, about what's the yearly enrollment? Yes, well we have brand new numbers. We just this is our our biggest enrollment yet. We have a hundred and forty thousand students altogether. UM. But uh, you know, part of that is online, but those online learners are still very much enmeshed in our culture. UM. But it's a lot. It's a lot of people we get to tell stories about. And today we're going to talk about saving faces and doing campus photography right. And it's based on a presentation that Cindy...

...gives campus wide, or at least to the relevant colleagues at a s U. Cindy, one of the first points that you present is entitled the Power of Face. And of course I think I know what that means. But if you could give me a little detail of what you present when you're talking about that. Sure, okay, so this is this is the part that I really love is when you talk about our faces. Our brains are hardwired for faces, and we forget that we actually all have the first We all share our first language across the whole world, and that's faces, because from the moment we're born, we focus on faces for the identity information of our caretakers but also social cues. So it's it's quite lovely that we all shared that language, and that's our first language is faces, and it's so important to our brains that we have a very specific part of our brain called the fusiform gyrus that is dedicated to recognizing and processing faces. And what neurosciences has found over the years is that we also have there's something called mirror neurons, and with the functionality of functional m r i s, they've been able to measure this so that our brains are wired to experience emotions identical to the ones were observing in others. So when we see somebody smile, that actually triggers joy in our own brains. Um So, just knowing the neuroscience behind why faces are so important, and uh, capturing joy is so important. UM is a great place for us to start. UM knowing that, uh, you know, all of us, all of us know when and um, a smile is fake, right, because that is our first language. We know when it's authentic, we know and it's fake, and we also experience joy when we see joy on others. I think that's so interesting, and I love what you've just said, because I mean it's I have my own drum that I beat and one of them is about UM. It's it's about those three things. It's one. It's like I need to see people. I mean, so many schools that I work with. It's like, oh, we have these photos on our website and there's the library, but it's empty. There's the quad, but it's empty. I mean a lot of the schools I work with, their smaller schools, and so they're you know, they're out there during the summer taking the photos because it's a chance that they get to to breathe. But I make a point that it's like, no one can relate to an empty you know, an empty photo without people. They can't relate when there are not faces. Because to your point, it's our first language. And I love that. I love the fact that you are really kind of showing that now now you've provided me some scientific data to back up my my clay, which is great. But I also talk...

...a lot about the idea that emotion is really what we do. I mean, if you think about most of the time when we make a purchase, and it's it's funny that the biggest purchase that someone might make is a higher education. Um, you know, that's that's going to be one of the biggest purchases they'll make in their life. And we buy based on emotion, and then we we justify based on our facts and everything else. But I think that your point to recognizing that faces can really start to transmit that emotion and help people, you know, feel that they're a part of that they feel that emotion. I love that, and I think that's so important. Is that what you're finding a lot when you when you see that, I mean, not only are you doing your you're suggesting that to everybody, but as you start getting feedback on you know, the results of your marketing. Obviously, a s U is doing an incredible job in the marketplace, but a lot of that has to be played out to that correct. Yes, because we do. We have a very vigorous process of also tell steen our images every year, so we are continually validated that that's what resonates with our audience is emotion. So it's not just the neurosciences, it's our Our audiences are telling us the same thing. Smiles. I know that that has a major effect on the way we view and the way we interpret a picture. Yeah, it's the classic thing. I've always heard three in a tree. I think there's actually a book written about that Higher Agency did where it's like, you know, three students in a tree in the fall is kind of the classic thing. And that goes back to your authenticity too. It's like, we've got to be authentic. We've got to show emotion and we've got to show faces. And I think that's the way that we're going to connect with honestly, anybody, but Generation Z especially, I'm sure that you've found in your own marketing and your own research with your team and the results that you've seen, you know, they can they can spot something that's fake a mile away. Oh yeah, and they don't like it. Um and are testing validates that we had we tested some graduation images just a couple of years ago, and we had this really great studio shot and it was untill the supposed they were throwing balloons, they looked joyful, right, But then we tested that against the actual you know, event photo where people are authentically celebrating together and howting each other and you haven't told the models what to do, You're just capturing what's real. And the post photo just tanked did not do well that and we thought, we're like, oh, they're gonna love this photo. It's fun. And um, so testing is also very important. You know, we can't trust our own opinions. Um, we need to we need to ask and listen. Well, let me ask you about that. Let's kind of take that to the next step then, because I mean one of the things that you often present is the idea of experienced design and and the idea we just talked about authenticity. We talked about you know, post photos, but I mean probably the other opposite end of this experiencing is is stock photos. And you know, back in the day, you know,...

...when I started my career, you know, you'd get the big thick books and you would pull up the stock photos and you know it was gonna cost you three thousand dollars to to get a stock photo. But today, I mean, we can go online and grab one. And unfortunately, I see the same kid in about thirty seven different ads for schools, And so I'm just curious, how do you guys kind of you know, look at that, you know, as it relates to that authenticity and and and the use of stock photos or or models versus that authenticity you just talked about. Yeah, I actually have a very relevant story related to that because I was working with one of the issue lawyers from the General Council Office and we were working on a project with m She wrote the language for our model releases, and we had this healthy debate and she was like Cindy. Um, in typical lawyer fashion, She's like, Cindy, you should never ever use a photo of a real student. Always just buy stock photos. And I was like, wait, what like that is that is not the way we roll, That's not the story. We have to tell real stories. Um. But from a Lauria perspective, she wanted to keep the university safe. Um. And from a storyteller perspective, I want to tell a real story. Um. So uh, we did, you know, find compromises. We have a very rigorous process on how we collect the model releases, UM, how we talk to students, how we recruit students, UM, and we do. We're very intentional about UM. You know, we're all experience designers. Were, UM, let's be intentional about it for our students, for each other, for the institution. So I can go into some of those details if that's helpful as far as kind of our process, it'd be great to hear some of that, Yes, please, thank you. Yeah. So the number one thing to remember is that you know, our students are sharing their identity with us, and UM, we we always want to be respectful for that. Uh. With that um, and it's interesting. UM. I didn't quite realize it until um. Uh we were doing the photo shoot downtown on the Downtown campus and we had this brilliant student that we had photographed the previous year and the photos turned out so well that our community used him a lot. And when I saw him, I was like, Hi, do you want to be in the photo shoot this year? We love the photos of you? And he was like, oh my gosh, no, I do not. I'm so tired of people telling me that you've seen me on buses and brochures and magazines and um. So when I went back to the office, I you know, kind of collected how much we've used them and just our office had you know, reproduced four thousand images of him on several different publications, and so, um, I was like, oh, we do need to, like, you know, ask students. I continued on and asked a couple more student and I was like, does this...

...bother you that your friends, you know, are texting you and saying, hey, I see you on a su stuff and they're like, oh my gosh, I love it. So so it's helpful to know that students have different values, you know, as far as feeling. You know, they do want to be out there and represent the institution and some are a little more hesitant and want to be a little more private. So I think that's important to remember and to ask Yeah, that's great, and I think I think what I also want to I just want to pause here because I'm sure a lot of people are listening and they're like, Okay, well this is great. I don't have a staff of you know, twenty photographers and videographers. I don't have you know, lawyers at my back and call all this stuff. And so but I want to kind of take this down. So everybody who's listening, whether they're a tiny school of a hundred students or or a large States institution like yours, I want to put everything on the bottom shelf. You know, we're talking about a lot of things, but everything can be you know, scaled down. I mean, getting a getting a release and doing some of the practices that you're talking about here. Is it just takes discipline. I mean, it doesn't take a lot of budget, doesn't take any special things that a s U has that nobody else has. It just takes a little bit of you know, hustle to get that done. And I would also say, and I encourage people a lot of times that remember that the phone that you have in your pocket, the smartphone that you have is has more technology and is more better quality than what an average photographer studio and videography broadcast studio had fifteen or twenty years ago. And so you know, getting getting a little you know, tripod mount for your for your iPhone or your or your Galaxy, or getting a lobby or mike that plugs into that and and just some decent lighting just standing by some windows and things. You can get some pretty good quality off of an iPhone and a smartphone. And so I just wanted to pause before we get too much further into the Cindy, because I mean, you've got some great ideas and there's a lot of ways that a s U is doing it. But I want people to realize, don't zone out because it's like, well, I'm not a SU. No, you can do the same principles of what Cindy is talking about. It's just gonna be it's gonna look a little different, but it's the same principles. Would you agree with that, Sunday, Oh? Absolutely, And I'm glad you made that point as far as bringing it down to the bottom shelf, because it's not only disciplined that it's honestly, it's the human connection, right, really connecting with the students UM and having those conversations UM. One of the things we learned, and this is here's a little pro tip, is U having like hiring a student photographer is also really powerful. And it was a lesson I learned when my husband and I have four daughters, and when our two youngest were in the high school volleyball team. We volunteered to be the photographers for the team, and we would always take photos of the game and after the game. And there was one night when we just handed the camera over to our our youngest daughter and said, hey, why didn't you go take photos of your friends? And the photos that she got were so much better than the ones we did. And we realized it was because she has she was pier and she had the relationship and...

...she could she made they felt more natural being photographed by her than by you know, parents. And I took that lesson that I learned, UM and brought that to the workplace as far as we need to have um, you know, student photographers and go out and photograph their peers so the peers feel more comfortable and you know, can be more authentic and comfortable in front of the camera. Yeah, that's a great that's a great tip. I mean, and we all have students, we all have student workers, and uh, you know, and and they they are quite adept at that with the social media. I mean, they're used to using camera on the phone, they're used to doing all of that, and so just with a little bit of direction and helping them understand what it is that you're looking for. Most of them can do that pretty pretty officially. That's a great tip. We talk a lot about it on the show. Schools are really struggling today to make the same at spen Work, CPMs are up eighty nine year over a year on Facebook and Instagram. Our college clients are no longer looking for rented audiences. They're looking for an owned community where they can engage students even before they apply. This is why Zemi has become so crucial for our clients. With over one million students, close to ten thousand five star ratings, consistently ranked as one of the top social lapps, and recently one of Apple's Hot Apps of the Week. There simply isn't anything out there like it, and we have seen it all. Zemy not only provides the best space for student engagement, but the most unique and actional data for their one sixty college and university partners. We know firsthand from our clients that ze Me is a must have strategy for gen z Check them out now at colleges dot zem dot com. That's Colleges dot z e m E dot com and yes, tell them Barton Troy sent you and like we have been introduced to a number of our guests, Alex at the College Tour connected us with Cindy and I would love to hear little bit about your experience with a college tour and also I know that you it's very important to you to give back to the students that participate in the photos that you take and taking the photos and that of participated on the college tour. Could you tell us a little bit about that? Sure? Sure? So I was I was asked to lead to be the university producer on the college Tour project, which was an amazing experience. Um, but as we were recruiting students and um uh you know, getting the students ready for that project, I realized, like, these students are telling some some of them are talent, really vulnerable stories about their life and and it's going to be on Amazon Prime, you know for years. Um, what can we do to make this a really you know, um meaningful experience for them, a positive experience, but then also give back to them. And what I learned from that whole experien variants is, you know, the students...

...want to connect with each other. So a lot of the a lot of the communications I did with them was like, hey, we're It's not like you're just going to be a piece of this. It was we're going to co create something inspiring together. And they the students latched onto that and love that and then also connected with each other. Um. Several of them became very good friends. UM. It felt like a little family, and a lot of that had to do with the college tour folks just also saying that we're a little family creating something together. UM. So you know, that's one example. Another example is when we do our graduation video UM, right before graduation. At graduation, we we frame that with the families because we bring in the families and we create this lovely experience where the students and the families tell each other things that they might not have told each other if we didn't set that stage for them. So it like captures this really special moment that we we created, a moment that they might not have had, UM where they can, you know, really share their gratitude for each other and their pride for each other. UM. So creating experiences is one way we give back. UM. Sometimes we'll tell the students, hey, if you're in photos, will take some portraits of you as well and share those and you can use them on LinkedIn. UM. That's another good way to give back to your students, UM, giving them, like especially if we use them on a cover of a big like the view book, we send them, you know, copies so they can have them as well. UM. So just thinking of all the little things you can do, UM for your students. Just to think them because you're you really are. They're sharing with us right there, sharing their time and their identity. That's great, that's great. And I know you've talked a little bit about me. We talked about the power of face and so we went through that, and we talked about now getting into the experience and and and what that is with the experience of these students, and how a lot of that with the college tour you know, played out, and and I love the point to I just want to make a quick little point on that. Talking to them about co creating something I think was brilliant because I think if you look at some of the stats, especially Generation Alpha and and a lot of the Generation Z, when they're asking in elementary school, what do you want to be when you grow up? The number one answer now as a YouTube creator or a social media creator. And so the idea that we're playing into that idea that they all want to be creators and this is a way to co create, I think is a great way to approach approach these students. And so so we're talked about experience, we talked about the power face. Let's talk a little bit about the process, the design of going through and actually doing the process that the the nuts and bolts of how you all are using images of your students in the faculty. Before I start going into the nets and bolts, I'll leave this with a ground in a story that makes it very meaningful. Um. We because sometimes as a team, you know it is it's a bit...

...rigorous and you have to be detailed about doing this. And then at times the team and I've been doing this for fifteen years, so the team was like, why do we have to do this or especially when we work with our with our media relations um folks, because at least at a s U are media relations photographers are amazing and but they're very much in the mentality of this is editorial. I don't need a model release. Um. But we've finally we finally made connections with them. We're like, but we want to use your photos too. They're so great, you know, we'll support you and getting model releases if we can use your photos. Um. But there was this one. Uh, there was a it was a couple of years ago now and a s you had some billboard around the city that promoting different programs. And I was actually on a date with my husband one Friday night and I started getting all of these text from our chief brand officer saying, uh, Cindy, this this billboard has hit social media. The students is upset. I need a model release, like right now. And uh, I said, can can I get it to you Monday? And They're like, no, I need it tonight. So I was like, oh my goodness, I'm gonna have to drive. Um, I'm gonna have to drive back into the office and dig through paper files. And when I got home, I looked on our server and we had just started a process where we have the students signed the model release, but then we also have them hold it up and then we all take a picture with our cell phones of them holding the model release so we can so we can attach their face to their name, and then we put them on the server and we retitled the file the name of the student. And so as soon as I got home, I looked on the server and I found it. I found the photo of the student holding up a model release and I sent it to the chief brand officer and I was like, Okay, we're covered. But what I did learn from that whole experience is like, we can do better. Even though we were covered legally and the students had signed off on that, we should have let them know we were going to put them on a billboard. Um, So that was a learning moment for for us as a community as far as let's take it up a notch and make sure the students know when we're using them on a bus, on a billboard, something really high profile. So the how we do so how we do it is when we go out go out on campus. We we talked to him and we and it's important to tell him what the photo is going to be used for. That we're, you know, the recruitment team. We do the recruitment marketing. This might be on websites or in brochures. They signed them out of release and then we have them take a picture holding it. We file them physically and digitally um and then rename it uh so that we could easily find their name. Very important for the privacy bite is sign which we can go into later.

And then so it's a it's a it's a discipline you have to do, but it makes your life so much easier in the future if you need to find it, if you need to pull a photo. Yeah, I mean that's that's a great idea, whether it's a whether it's your own personal server or whether it's a Google drive or Box account or something. Just being able to have you know, model releases, you've got them in there by their name um and as well as that photo, I think is a brilliant move And I love that idea. I think it's a really very practical and pragmatic tip for everybody to kind of go through that and and go from there. So I really like that. Thank you along that thinking privacy and the whole g d p R was it just took the industry by storm when it was first announced. And would like to know your approach of against staying authentic and making sure that you're getting actual students but also keeping the legality. In my mind, if you could kind of explain your approach to that, sure, because privacy by design is a really important thing. That was part of the g d p R, which I'm not sure if this community was freaked out as much as we all were VIA and that's the General Data Protection Regulation UM where the U A, the U E put some real muscle behind it, like if you violated it, it was gonna be UM, it was going to cost a lot UM. So I think that's why it took us all by notice. But then as you as you've seen, and I think they're just leading the way right for others are adopting that same that same philosophy, and it's the right thing to do UM as far as if a student doesn't want to be in your library anymore, we should respect that and be able to take him out. But you have to have the processes in place to easily find them, to be able to pull them because part of the the g d p R rules are it's not just their data a personal data, it's also their images UM in your library. So we took that very serious and did set up some process design so we can respond respectfully to our students if they want to be pulled out. And what are is just some of the practical ways that you're doing that. I mean, you're using metadata, are you using how are you doing that in your photo libraries. Yeah, it's so funny because the creative director in the in the Enterprise Brands management team and I we joke all the time that metadata is our love language because it's so important for us to be able to not only make sure we know who the students are in the photos so we can contact them if we use them on something high profile, but also make sure we're using them in the right context because, um, you know, from a graphic designer's perspective, they're looking at the library, right and they find a great photo and they're like, I want to use this photo of let's say, an engineering student,...

...but in the wrong context. You know, if you use them in a different discipline, we don't know that. The marketers don't know that, but that student knows that. It's like, why are you presenting me in something um that? Um is it relevant? Or The story I tell my team too is like it would be similar to if we used a photo of a student who was, you know, very passionately a vegan, if we used them on a poster for a barbecue like that validates I mean that violates their values. Um, I mean that's really intense. I don't know, we don't have that intense of metadata in there, but it's a good example of just making sure we're telling the right story and are respectful of our students identities. Cindy, are there any other thoughts or ideas around a image or a campus photo program that we haven't covered that you feel we should put out there before winding up our episode. I think one of the most meaningful things for me is, UM, I'm not sure if you're familiar with the designer Bruce Now. Um, if anybody needs a little expiration or inspiration, If anybody needs a little inspiration, Uh, just watch the MAO documentary on YouTube. I've watched it for the third time last night with my husband. But he was a designer that was very influential in a s U S brand. But he's the one who taught me ten years ago that, UM, everything communicates. Uh, it's not just what we say, it's what we do. UM that communicates stronger than what we say. So as marketers were saying a lot, right, we're saying a lot about our institution. Who we are, but we have to remember how we do it. And what we do is even stronger because you're you're creating advocates among students. If we treat them with respect and you know, kindness, they will You're building affinity um with the student towards the institution because we're you know, a s U isn't uh, it's organic. It's just people. You know, every every university is just a group of people, right and and it's how we treat each other. You know, speaks volumes. Thank you very much, Cindy. Cindy, you've shared a lot with us, and I know you do a lot of work around developing and spreading how to have a vibrant campus photo program. If there's someone that's listening and would like to get some information from you, what would be the best way for them to connect with you? Oh yeah, they can just find me on LinkedIn, send me a message on LinkedIn. And I love the community at home, uh and would help anybody if they have questions. I mean, we have such a we have such...

...a sacred job, right like, uh, college students there there, this is their time in their life when they're figuring out who they are and We're here to help them find the right fit as far as which university to go to and then how to get involved. And that's just such a like thrillion job to have and anytime we can help each other do it better, you know, I'm all in thank you. And that's Cindy with an Eye Farmer at Arizona State University. And when you go to her profile you will see a big smile. Thank you very much, Cindy for being our guest today. Cindy, we always like to end our episode with this question. If there is a piece of advice that you could give a listener that they could implement soon after listening, what would that be? Yeah, you know, the biggest thing I've learned from doing this work is just making the human connection when you're out among the students, really connect with them. Is you know, one human to another. Create those experiences not only with the students, but also with your team. Like I know a lot of people don't have a big team, but many times we take you know, we'll ask a writer to come out and do model releases with us, and it's so energizing for them to be out among campus among the students as well. So just being wildly, wildly curious about people and asking a lot of questions because people are just so interesting. Find joy, capture joy, rippled the joy that you know, let's just be humans and caring for each other. Bart, what are your closing thoughts? Just a few thoughts. I think that Cindy kind of gave us such a really good pragmatic approach to a lot of really good things on this episode today, and so you might want to go back and re listen to kind of some of those stats about the power of face and the idea of of how important it is for us to actually show authenticity and emotion in the way that we communicate through our photography. Talked a lot about experience and making sure that not only are the prospective students experiencing your campus through the design that you're doing in the photography, but you're also doing something for your existing students who are serving as your models, serving as those faces of your institution, and making sure that that's a real positive experience for them. And then we also, you know, just talked about some pragmatic things about, you know, just how to organize your files, get those get those in place that you can you know, quickly respond if somebody has an issue with the way that there their photography and their faces being, their identities being represented with your school, and then just you know, the ideas of there's a lot more going on with privacy today that you need to be aware of. And so all of this that we've talked about, I will reiterate again that I think that even the smallest of the small schools can do some of this with discipline. You can do some of this with the tools you already have in place. Um you know. If you don't have a model release, google it. I mean, you'll find some someplace that will have a decent model release that you can modify, um uh for your own school and make it work. But I think at the end of the day,...

...we're not talking about necessarily how do we all you know, uh, you know, cover ourselves from a legal standpoint. We're talking about what is the right thing and the best thing to do on behalf of our school as it relates to our students and the and the and the community that we have. And so, Sandy, thanks so much for being on the show today. It's been a pleasure getting to know you, and thanks for your wisdom thank you. The Highered Marketer podcast is sponsored by Kaylor Solutions and Education marketing and branding agency and by Think Patented, a marketing execution company combining print and mail for higher ED outreach solutions on behalf of Bark Kaylor. I'm Troice Singer. Thank you for joining us. You've been listening to The Higher ED Marketer. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you're listening with Apple Podcasts, we'd love for you to leave a quick rating of the show. Simply tap the number stars you think the podcast deserves. Until next time, h.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (89)