The Higher Ed Marketer
The Higher Ed Marketer

Episode · 2 months ago

More Than a Campus Logo: The Evolutionary Branding Process

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Technology-driven solutions in branding are remarkable tools. But shiny gadgets can make it easy to lose sight of your higher ed marketing team’s ultimate goal: giving prospective students a quality value proposition.

William Faust , Senior Partner and Chief Strategy Officer at Ologie , shares his insights on brand management and how smaller schools can raise the stakes in their branding game through differentiation.

Join us as we discuss:

  • Why branding is a constant evolutionary process (4:33)
  • Branding for a mission-fit audience (12:03)
  • Which KPIs actually matter for smaller schools (25:04) 

Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast:

To hear this interview and many more like it, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website or search for The Higher Edge in your favorite podcast player.

You're listening to The Higher Ed Marketer, a podcast geared towards marketing professionals in higher education. This show will tackle all sorts of questions related to student recruitment, donor relations, marketing trends, new technologies, and so much more. If you're looking for conversations centered around where the industry is going, this podcast is for you. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the Higher Ed Marketer Podcast. I'm Troy Singer with Ring Digital. Also here with my co host Bart Kaylor of Kaylor Solutions, and today we get to talk to Bill Faust and he is the senior partner and chief strategy Officer of Apology, and he is going to bring his wisdom and his experience about branding and marketing to the conversation. And I will say it was a pleasure listening to both Bart and Bill go through the topics of branding and marketing. Yeah, I have always respected Bill Anology. I think that from a distance they've they've done some amazing work. They are really working with the biggest brands in higher education. So you think about the D one Schools and and all of those large brands. A lot of that work comes out of Oology in Columbus, Ohio, and I've been really impressed with him, and this conversation was was great. Um. We were introduced through Ethan Braden Perdu University, who has been a guest a few times on the podcast, and I really like how Bill and I were able to talk about branding and marketing. And I love how he was able to kind of kind of get down to the basics and the foundations of things so that it's very accessible, even though he does work on these large campuses, in these large schools with large projects, we were able to kind of put it in a place that it's accessible to the lowest shelf, so that even the smallest schools that are listening are really gonna be able to walk away with some really key pragmatic takeaways. If you've ever wanted to get free advice from a high level individual, don't walk away from this episode. Here is our conversation with Bill Faust. Bill, thank you for being a guest on the podcast. We are so happy and honored to have you. Oh it's my pleasure. Thank you. We like to start out our conversations with our guests with the question, please share with the something that you've learned recently that you might think is interesting enough for the community to know. A great question. I don't know if this will be interesting to everybody, but I think my biggest revelation lately is about six weeks ago, I became a grandparent for the first time, which thank you, which you know number one makes me feel old, although you know you're as young as you feel, right. But I think the thing I've learned from it is just how everybody warned me. They're like, your priorities will change, right, You'll you'll you'll start shifting the way you allocate your time, and you know how much...

...time you want to spend with your grandkid and all that, and they're absolutely right, like it's it's all my wife. My wife and I are consumed with it. Now. We're like, we're we're going to move to Baltimore so we can be close to him. Um, not really, but I mean, you know, we've talked about it. So so that's that's kind of a new thing for me. That's really fun and exciting. Congratulations. Yes, most new grandparents are shouting it from the rooftops, and I believe everyone thinks that that's interesting. So blessings to you and your family. Thank you. We love the fact that we have you on being a senior partner at Apology. If you would, for those who might not be familiar with your agency, if you can give us a brief introduction. Yeah, absolutely. UM I'll start with Oology and then I can sort of fill in a little bit about me. But Apology Oology is a is a branding and marketing agency, UM that is focused almost exclusively on education. Most of that is higher education, so a core clients or colleges and universities, and we do work with what I call some adjacent categories and healthcare, museum as cultural organizations, but most of those are come to us because there somehow connected to education, or they have an educational mission or or or might be a fundraising connection or something like that. UM. So you know, we we basically do marketing for the greater good, and uh, you know, I love it because every day we get up and say, okay, not only are we going to do fun stuff, but you know it's going to make the world a little bit better anyway. UM. So that's ology. We've been around for thirty or five years, but kind of our current self is about years old ish um, and my role. I'm one of the two partners along with Bev Ryan, who found anology. I tend to focus on more of what I call the the outside stuff, the you know, finding new clients and our marketing efforts and our account management and relationship management efforts. And then when I can and I actually roll up my sleeves and participate as a strategist with key, key relationships, key accounts, which is also super fun. So kind of that's it in a nutshell, Thank you. We're going to talk about both marketing and branding. Would like to know from your seat and your experience when it comes to how an institutions should look at their brand. What we do you think or in your opinion, what is the best way for them to do so? Um all the time. That's a little bit, that's a little bit of a joke, but there's some logic behind it. Well. I mean, you know, what I would call contemporary definition of a brand, um is that it's about a lot more than sort of the traditional definition, right. I mean the word branding, you know, derived from you know, putting a brand on cattle, right, Um, So it was a logo, a stamp of mark. Um. But today, it's about an organizations kind of offer their experience, experience that they give...

...to all their stakeholders. Um, and then the story that you tell authentically to you know, convey what that offer is and what that what that value proposition, if I can use a little jargon is. And so it's a very nuanced and complex thing. And when I joked and said all the time, it's because you know, brand managing a brand is a day year effort. And occasionally someone will say to me like, oh, we did our brand three years ago, and I'm like, I don't even understand that, you know, like did your brand. And what they're saying is is that they took a fresh look at it, and they might have, you know, kind of taking a deeper dive than normal. But I think if you manage your brand all the time, you don't have to do that. It's an evolutionary process. And so I've said to people, I want to put rebranding out of business and just you know, celebrate brand management. Yeah. I think that's a great point their bill, and I know that we kind of got introduced through Ethan Braden, who's been a podcast guest a couple of times from his role as a CMO at Pretty University. And I know that you and Ethan worked together on the Persistent Pursuit brand branding that they are working on and working out, uh, And I think Ethan has a great passion on that, and I think you're right. I think that it's unfortunate that so many colleges, universities especially get confused a little bit on what this is. That it is just that logo, or it is that color palette or you know, hey, we've got that under control. We didn't need to worry about that. But I try to tell people sometimes too, it's it's it's as simple as what do I feel when I walk in from my car? I mean, what what is what is the experience that I'm having getting frustrated finding a parking spot as a prospective student or or as a donor or whatever. So you know, unpack that a little bit, because I think it's it's something that I think every president and provost and you know, enrollment professional need to kind of keep in mind. And maybe you can kind of explain a little bit more. Yes, I couldn't agree with you more. Um, I think so, First of all, I love what you said there because one of the benefits many benefits working with Ethan, but one of them is he has brought some of his other agencies to Produe that he used to work with it at Eli Lily places that he was in the past, and one of them is a company called Brand Trust out of Chicago. There is mostly a research agency. But but what I love about their philosophy is they sort of boil it down simply to the most important thing about a brand is how it makes you feel. They have books about this, and it sounds so simple, but it's not. And it is something that I think a lot of leaders in higher ed find a little too elusive to wrap their arms around. Um. And so that's why, you know, you have to have a discipline of answering that question. You know, how do we want students to feel? How do we want parents to feel? How do we want alumni to feel when they think about Perdue or Nebraska or Sarah Lawrence...

...or whoever? And so I really think that, you know, I always sort of try to bring it back to that and always remind people that the things you said, like logos and color palettes, those are symbols. Those are tools that should be derived from you know, kind of what do we stand for and how do we want people to feel about us? Yeah, and I think it's important too. And and you know, just you and I talked earlier when I was inviting you on the show that you know, we we have similar roles, We've got similar agencies. We just happened to fish in different ponds. Um, you guys are doing work with with Produce and Nebraskas and other ones. I've got a smaller pond that I'm fishing in. And but I think that one of the things And because I have such a broad range of listeners trying to I do on this podcast, sometimes I think people get scared and they think, oh, you're talking about branding. That's a that's a very expensive endeavor that we would never be able to afford. We could never do that. But I think when you it down to the point when we start talking about how are you making people feel, there's a lot of things that people can do without bringing in a huge agency, bringing in other people, because a lot of it gets down to, well, how would I want to experience this place if I were coming in for the first time. Talk about that, because I'm sure that's part of the exercises that you do even as a strategist. And that's a great point part managing a brand, developing a brand strategy. It doesn't require what you and I do. We're happy that there are some there's some institutions out there that, you know, say, hey, we need some extra help here. So we're happy about that. But but you know, if you're a marketing leader at a small college or a small anything, thankly, um, it's it. You know, there's plenty of resources to help you figure out how to define. You know, what do we stand for as a as an organization, as a brand? Um? What does that mean that in terms of the way we deliver our offer, the way we communicate, the way we you know, create an experience every day. Um. And I think everybody should do that. I think if you have a bed and breakfast, you should do that and you don't have to hire anyone to do it. If you get into specific things like oh, we want a better logo, then sure, if you don't have graphic designers on staff, you need some specific help. But that's the last stuff you should get to. I think the most important stuff is, you know, kind of the ethos of the organization and then how you live that every day, um and and and so I think I think it can be for everybody. And I don't think it requires an agency necessarily. I've told people before, if you want to figure out my philosophy and my marketing on you go read my blog and my content. It's all there. But people are like, I don't have time. I would rather hire you to do it. That's that's what it comes down to a lot of times. But I think that it's interesting too. You talked about that ethos and someone I was having a conversation with somebody the other day talking about the difference between Starbucks and Duncan. It's like there's two different experiences that both of them are representing their brand. One is, you know, the idea of sitting down, enjoying conversation, having a a second place...

...to be able to do life. And and it's inviting them to stay. Duncan's designed where you know America runs. It's it's fast, it's get them in, get them out. You know, there's not that warm sense of you're gonna hang out and Duncan and just you know, have your meetings. There two separate brands. Ultimately, selling the same product in a lot of ways, but there's different experiences and they draw different crowds and different individuals to those brands based on that, And I think that's the key sometimes is as an institution, um, as a college or university, understanding your audience well enough to know how to position who you are naturally to be able to draw the right type of mission fit students, donors, engagement. How do you feel about that? First of all, I use I think retail is one of the best places to draw analogies to hire ed even though sometimes people bristle a little bit because they feel like it's somehow cheapens the conversation or something. But that's a great example. I hadn't thought of that example. The one I always use when I get pushed back is Lows and Home depot, who essentially sell the same stuff um and it's in their general merchandisers right, they sell a lot of different stuff Because schools will often say, well, we it's easy for Pratt to define its brand because they only do you know, sort of design and architecture, But we can't do that. And I'm like, no, you can. If you look at Lows and Home depot Lows has said, or home depot has said, you know, we're going after a kind of the contractor um that it's more of a male audience. It's more of a roll up or sleeves d I true, d I y audience. Loses said, we're going to go more after after the homeowner who isn't confident, who might be female, who might you know, want some help doing some of these projects and choosing the right things. And they're both legit brand positionings. They go after slightly different markets, you know, with the kind of a similar offer, but they their whole experience is different because of who they're going. I think every college university can think that way and develop their own brand. Yeah. I think that's a great, great example. I love that. We would also like to get your expertise, your opinion on marketing and maybe starting out by describing some of the trends that you are noticing or the changes that you're seeing that's going on within higher ed marketing. No, great, Um, well, I think hired marketing. You know, marketing, branding is a big word. Marketing is kind of an even bigger word, and so you have to definitely have to unpack it a lot, But I view marketing and sort of taking everything about the brand, the story of the value proposition and putting it out there UM, so that you know, you're kind of driving some collection of results. And I think in higher ed the marketing lights are burning brightest and enrollment right now, enrollment campaigns, enrollment marketing efforts, ongoing efforts. Probably just right behind them. Right...

...behind enrollment is you know, kind of fundraising and philanthropy and advancement. And then we're seeing a growing marketing effort and just reputation building, you know, just kind of some people call it brand marketing, and I think that's going to continue as well. So all three of those are a little different because they focus on slightly different audiences, but they're all starting to use the same you know kind of approach and are similar approaching techniques. Like so trends we're seeing digital first, absolutely, but not digital only. It's about getting in the right mix, so some traditional media still makes sense and certain for certain audiences and certain channels. UM. It's also about you know, a more differentiated message, um, and and how important it is and how important and that comes from the brand, so how important you know it is to to have that differentiated message, not just sit on the shelf and your brand standards, but actually be in the marketplace and be tied to a specific you know, call to action or something like that. So I see in marketing and hire it, I see more rapid change than I do on the brand side. But it kind of makes sense when you think about what's happening, you know, to hire a changing from all different angles. Yeah, I love that, and I love the fact that you really pointed out that differentiating Um. That's one of the things that I continually talk a lot about. I'm sure you do as well. Where you know, people, especially in enrollment, they want to talk about, well, here's our cross apps, who who's our competition, this is how we're working with it, this is what we're doing. And UM, at least for me, a lot of times, I'm kind of in a vertical a niche within Higher ed where it's like, well, we're another faith based school just up the road, just like that other faith based school. Like okay, no you're not. There's differences, there's uniqueness about your school. What is something that you do that no one else can do differently? And and I really challenge people on that, and I'm sure that you get these conversations too. You know, we're in our one in institution, just like they're in our one institution or different things like that. There's that idea of really being able to kind of lean into what is truly unique and different about your experience, your brand, everything about who they are. I mean, what are some of the things that you run into when people are pushing back on the differentiated or do they find it? Do bigger schools have kind of that already figured out sometimes and they know where to start? Um, I would say no, I think all schools struggle with that, right like bigger, smaller, highly ranked not highly ranked it. I don't think it matters. And I just think it's because higher ed came from a place that was relatively not competitive. It was collegial where the world comes from. Um. And and even to the point where and this still happens today, which is kind of cool actually that hired you know, shares sort of best practices and so it there was not the pressure to have a differentiated message, you know, even even heard schools you know, like we're the hard it of the Midwest, as you know. But I...

...think today, especially in enrollment. You have to have you have to define what it is that authentically makes you you um and every school is different. You just have to dive deeper. Layer after layer two you get to how it's different. Sometimes it's a culture, sometimes it's sometimes it is just the way you package your message, and that's okay. You know, you can have two schools that are almost identical in terms of their offer and their size and their location, but one, like faith based schools, is interesting. You know, you can have two Jesuit schools and one can talk about itself very differently than another. Loyal Loyal Merimount can talk about itself very differently than Gonzaga, And maybe that's the biggest difference. But that conversation they're having, that brand story, it's probably different because it's based on how they were founded, how they approach, you know, blending their faith and their educational approach. So I think it's just I think it's just diving deep. You just can't do it on the surface because on the surface a lot of schools look the same. Yeah, it's really I like how you talked about that. It's almost like mining. You have to mind that information out of the institution. And the institutionals shared knowledge, and I think that's the importance of a lot of focus groups. Let me go back to something else that you just talked about, to this idea of that. You know, we've talked about enrollment, we talked about advancement. I'm sure a lot of my audience was like, what was that third one? He talked about that reputation marketing And you'll unpack that a little bit, because I think that's an interesting, Like you said, it's an interesting new, um, new direction that a lot of schools are taking, and it's not for everyone. But tell me a little bit about what what you're experiencing with that. Yeah, I think it's it varies by school. I mean, we have had some schools come to us with this ask, with this request, and their motivation was to move up in the rankings, right, So some sometimes it's driven by that, which I I agree and disagree with. Like, I understand the sentiment, but but I don't. I don't advise any school to to sort of focus too much on the rankings. That's easy for me to say, but but I think I think more the cases, um, you know, like we just we just were in the process of doing a large kind of reputation building campaign with the University of Pittsburgh, and their goal is simply to make sure that they're understood beyond their kind of traditional footprint of western Pennsylvania, UM and the surrounding contiguous states. So that the campaign is meant to remind people what Pit's all about. And it's to remind people in the Northeast corridor and in d C and and in Philadelphia, which you'd think, like, well, that's the same state, but Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, like they might as well be different states. UM. And so it's really just to make sure that people understand. It's the build awareness, but it's also to make sure they understand, like what's what's BIT all about, like what drives them, what you know, kind of what's behind them, UM, so that they can...

...be in the consideration setting not just for enrollment, but for funding for research projects, for you know, competing for philanthropic dollars when you have multiple households where you might have a penn State grad and a PIT grad and a lot of different people in the household. So I think it's kind of like it drive it supports all efforts. It's kind of an umbrella campaign. That's great, and I think that a lot of times those types of campaigns and even down to enrollment and development, everything that has to do with marketing, I think comes out of somebody thinking about marketing on the campus kind of all the time. And I think part of what I wanted to talk about. We had Terry Flannery on the podcast a few weeks ago, and you know, she's written the book How to Marketing University, and one of the things that we talked about on the podcast that she was quite passionate about that I've given a lot of thought too, is is the idea of having marketing in some voice at the at the cabinet level. UM. You know, a lot of times it might be a chief marketing officer like like it some of the larger institutions. Other times it might be the combination of a vice president of enrollment and marketing or advancement. Sometimes marketing rolls up underneath them. Sometimes I've seen it just you know, literally the director of marketing reports directly to the president. UM, help me understand a little bit about what you see and where that's going, because, UM, I'm working with some small schools right now that and I had this conversation just a few minutes ago with part of my team, is that sometimes there's not an understanding of what marketing is doing, and even though it repulsed reports up to a leader, the leader sometimes isn't necessarily recognizing the importance that marketing could be doing other than just generating more leads. And so, you know, unpack that for me a little bit. Yeah, I agree with everything you said. And in the last you know, we've been in higher at about a dozen years and in that timeframe we've seen a continuous evolution toward a centralized, more focused marketing leader leadership model almost always on the cabinet, at cabinet level um. And I think, I think it's I think it's required. I don't even I'm not even saying anymore it's preferred. I'm saying it's required. Now. I know there's a lot of schools out there that don't have that. But you know, my advice would be to keep keep pushing finagling, you know, get your board members involved, whatever it takes, because it's it's the way that it's the successful way, but it's also the way a lot of other industries have proven that you know, marketing needs to be at the table and needs to have that voice. Um. Sometimes it's it's connected to the areas like advancement and enrollment that have the biggest voice in the brand. Other times it's a chief marketing and communications officer, because especially with smaller schools, there's a legacy of more of a communications kind of newsroom function. I don't think there's any right answer to that. I think the biggest right answer is is you know, higher ed can't spend its way to fame, right, they're just you just...

...hired, just can't compete yet with the budgets that other categories have. So if you fracture the brand by having it, you know, spread across multiple people, Um, you're going to work against yourself. You're going to create your own headwind. If if you consolidate as much as possible and speak with one voice and have one marketing effort that serves all the functions within the college or university, you're going to be able to overcome that disadvantage more quickly and more efficiently. Yeah, that's great, and I think you just rightly pointed out that there's a lot of different levels at different institutions and we're not going to be able to spend our way to that type of competition maybe in the other industries and types of things. But one of the things that I do know that happens when you do have somebody that is a chief marketing officer or somebody really understands marketing well at a leadership level, is they're really looking at those key performance indicators. They're really being able to take the data that is being generated by everything that we're doing. I mean, you know, we can we can take data out of systems like slate and and enrollment data, we can take it out of you know, systems for for advancement. But then we also with all of our digital campaigns, I mean we have we have data you know at the ready. What are some of the KPI s that that you, you know, as a strategist start looking at from marketing that you kind of help your clients to focus on. And I know that varies based on whether it's enrollment or advancement or reputation, but I mean, just for just for a common you know, three or four KPIs that you think are important for people to be paying attention to. We always advise no matter what, even if we're not doing branding work for a client, we always advise that they have a kind of a brand dashboard or like a brand health um you know kind of uh collection of KPI s and those are pretty straightforward. I mean awareness is one. It's not automatically measured in the marketplace, so it might be one that you have to measure yourself. Uh, you know, perceptions and association is another one, and again that's not something that's measured. I do think as long as the rankings are out there, you need to you know, have those as part of the dashboard. And then I think it's just the overall you know, metrics of areas like enrollment advancement UM and and how and and the things that you know, kind of marketing drives to move those forward. There's a lot of things that marketing doesn't necessarily have control over, like you know, your financial aid package or or things like that. But but I those are the kind of things we recommend in a brand dashboard. And then everything else when we get into KPIs is kind of at the campaign level, uh, you know, engagement KPI s and you know kind of r O I for you know, kind of a media spend or an over all effort for a campaign. I'm not a big fan of the legion approach to especially enrollment, because I think it focuses too much on KPIs and not enough on putting the right message in the right place at the right time. Um. I understand where it comes from, but...

...um, but I think that schools over time are going to learn that just generating leads, you know, is you know, you can gain that system, but you can end up creating other problems like retention problems and that. Yeah, because I mean at the end of the day, and what we've worked with a client recently just on the idea of generating leads, but we've got to have mission fit leads. And I mean I don't mean mission fit sounds like it's only a faith based type of thing, but there's a mission fit for every university. It's it's the idea of is are the right students who are going to succeed the most at your institutions, the ones that are actually you know, getting in the inquiry pool from an enrollment standpoint and going through And so I think that's really critical and I really appreciate that that idea and I think that going back to what you said about the KPIs on the brand dashboard, teasing this out for some of the smaller schools that might be listening and they're like, oh, yeah, that sounds great. If if I could have research done every year, Well you actually can, I mean admitted student research. That's a good way to as you're some of that. Um, you know, you can certainly do some surveys with with alumni or even just uh, you know, there's there's a lot of ways to get that awareness, that perception research. And again it goes back to you know, reading some books, following up just reading some things. There's there's ways to bring all this down to the lowest shelf. And I think a lot of times that uh, it gets discounted too quickly because we're small. And so I just think that these these uh, these ideas are things that I want people to kind of keep in mind without getting tripped up on the fact of dismissing it to say I'm not big enough to be able to do that. I agree, there's a lot of tools out there. Um and and yeah, I completely agree that you should start with the metrics you already collect. Um, maybe just work a little harder to figure out, you know, the impact of marketing and brand work on those metrics and then measuring awareness, you know, it just depends on what your strategy is. Like I've heard, I've had some small schools say to us, like, we want to be a national brand, and I've as questions why, you know, like do you need to do that? Sure, if you get some kids from across the country, that's great, but you know, why don't show them the backyard start there and then and then that awareness is easier to measure. And sometimes I think even though small schools missed the opportunity that they could be a national brand within a certain niche of where they are, so like within a church or within a diocese or different areas of being able to be known within the context of who you are. Um, you know, you don't have to be the national brand that is, you know, the the D one football team that's on Saturday afternoons. Bill, I would like to revisit a conversation that we had off the podcast here on the podcast, if you allow, and it was because your opinion was so insightful and you said it was some passion and that's the topic of the new shiny object approach to enrollment marketing and would like to know what you're seeing and uh, give us your opinion on that and may be you know what you would recommend as an...

...alternative for some of the schools that follow that logic. Yeah, And what I what I mean by that is, um that I think too many schools and their enrollment functions have you know, are sort of tempted to seek out a solution that is that is you know, a technology driven solution that is going to you know, kind of be that to use an older term, killer app if you will, Um, that's going to just you know, definitely like beat everybody else's approach and get us you know, fill our funnel and it's all going to be the rate. And and while I'm not anti technology, I'm very pro technology. I'm very you know, as I said, we're a digital first mindset agency. Um, if you if you don't have the right story, if you don't have the right value proposition, the right message, no technology will save you, right I mean. And and so you have to work the whole old spectrum from you know again, what do we stand for, what do we offer? And then if that, if you can convert that into a really compelling message and story. Then leverage technology those shiny objects whatever they are channel you know CRM, I mean, you know what they all are, and then there's all sorts of variants of those kind of things. Then leverage those because you've got good ammunition to start with. When I go to a conference like NACAC and I kind of wander the exhibit hall, I just see so much emphasis on, you know, kind of the killer app mentality, and I'm looking around for like, who has a really good enrollment story, like helping me find that, and maybe a knack ats just not the right place to find that. But I'm not you know, it's a great conference, but but that's kind of what I mean. And yeah, I am a little passionate about that because I used to do a lot of work in banking and it was the same thing. This was decades ago, but it was the same thing when banking was sort of going through its disruption. Is that you know, there was was going to be a technology that was going to save banking. And I'm like, I think customer service and experience has a lot to do with why people want to bank with you as opposed to just you know, you have a better online bank. That's great. I agree with that, and I think that sometimes those shiny objects, I mean, I can't tell you, Bill, and you're hearing the same thing. It's like, well, what should we do on TikTok? What should we do? And be real? And I'm like, you know, you've got to figure out what you're gonna say before you even sign up for the for the account. And there's there is that sense that if we just do this, or if we just got that app, or if we just you know, did more of this lead gion, than we would have all of our problems solved, and it's going to turn into other problems later on. I agree with your your assessment on that you said earlier. So thanks for that that perspective. Our last question for you today, Bill, if there was a piece of advice that you could give that one of our listeners could take and implement immediately that you feel would move the needle for them, what piece of advice would you offer? Wow,...

...that's a big one. Um so many. I I think probably the area that I see that is that I wish I wouldn't see that. I see a lot is where so much emphasis on branding and marketing is a is about the outside versus the inside. What I mean by that is, you know, get some get alignment right, work hard to get not just within your small group of marketing and communications or large group whatever it is, get alignment across the institution. UM. And in terms of what you're trying to do, what's your story is what your messages? Um? You know, great brands, great marketing efforts start with everybody you know, kind of being on the same page. I mean it sounds kind of cliche and trite, but it's true. UM. And so often we first meet with somebody and we asked the question, like what kind of what's the climate on campus in terms of a support of branding understanding of it or support of marketing understanding of it. If we get an answer that's like, wow, it's not great, but don't worry about them, I'm like, I'm just like, no, like time out. UM. And I've just seen it time and time again when the school takes the time to get the inside right. Years ago, we worked with West Virginia right after dr Ge got there for the second time. And what I loved about the experience we had is we worked on their brand for I don't know, four to six months, and then they told us, they said, we're not rolling this out for another four to six months because we want to get all the deans and all the department heads and all the you know, all the internal leaders and stakeholders really aligned on this before we buy one billboard place one digital ad and I was like, wow, you yes, three more of this, so that would be the one I would jump on. That's great, thank you, Bill, And I would argue with thoughts like that is the reason why schools bring the both of you in, So thank you very much. I'm sure that people would after listening, would like to reach out to you, and what's the best way for someone to get a hold of you? What would that be? I try to be, even even though I'm an old grandfather, which I shared with you already, try to be as active on as many platforms as possible. I mean, clearly email is always great, be fau statology, dot com is is pretty easy to remember, but you know, linked in Twitter like like all those platforms, Instagram might try to be on all them so if anybody ever wants to reach out, and of course you know Alog dot com Um, you know there's there's ways to reach me on that as well. We're always willing to connect with people, but pretty easy to find. I think very good. Well, thank you for your time and the wisdom that you shared with us and the audience. Bart, do you have any final thoughts that you would like to share. I really enjoyed the conversation. Bill, thank you so much for being a part of the of the podcasts,...

...and Um, I just want to point out a few things that Bill said that I think are so important. Is that we talk a lot about branding, we talk a lot about messaging. We talk a lot about techniques and ways to do that. But I think that a couple of things that Bill has said a couple of times during this conversation that I just want to re emphasize. So whether we all understand and we all agree we have to start with messaging, we have to start with what differentiates you and who are you. Brands grow out of that, our marketing campaigns grow out of that, the communications grows out of And I think that alignment part that he talked about at the very end is so critical, is that can you define who you are and what makes you different? Can you put that in a messaging platform and can you get everyone on campus to degree on that then you can go after all those shiny objects, all the things that you need to do with the different ways that you're going to execute that campaign. But I really appreciate the fact that Bill is kind of starting at the ground floor, at the building blocks of where we need to go. And so um, really thanks again Bill, It's been a wonderful conversation and UH really appreciate all of the the inspiration that you've pre vided me personally over the years. So thank you, well, thank you. That's I'm thrilled to be on this and looking forward to hearing how it turns out. But thanks for the invit. I really appreciate it, sure thing. The Hired Marketer podcast is sponsored by Kaylor Solutions and Education marketing and branding agency and by Ring Digital, providing significant lift and yield following your list with precisely targeted ads. And also we could not do this podcast without our superstar producer, Rob Conlin of Westport Studios, So again on behalf of our guests, Bill Faust, Bart Kaylor and myself Troy Singer. Thank you for joining us. You've been listening to the higher ed marketer. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you're listening with Apple Podcasts, we'd love for you to leave a quick rating of the show. Simply tap the number of stars do you think the podcast deserves. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (92)